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February 13th, 2020:

PANEL DISCUSSION – THE STORIES AND SONGS OF US

PANEL DISCUSSION – THE STORIES AND SONGS OF US
11AM – 12PM SATURDAY 18 APRIL (TURBINE PLATFORM)

To understand Tibet, people must hear directly from Tibetans.  Join Karma Phuntsok and Tenzin Phuntsok Doring, sharing of very personal journey of what Tibet is for them. The Stories and Songs of Us gives an opportunity for the wider Australians to hear the very personal narratives and stories of Tibetan in their own words. These were narratives and reflections that celebrates the Tibetan spirit and real courage. Tenzin Nyidon and Tenzin Choegyal will share a song each for the audiences listening pleasure.

TIBETAN YOGA WITH KUNGA

TIBETAN YOGA WITH KUNGA
9.30AM – 10.30AM SATURDAY 18 APRIL (TURBINE PLATFORM)

Under the guidance of Tibetan yoga teacher Kunga, learn simple yet profound techniques that emphasize the integration of body, energy, and mind. Originally from Tibet, Kunga lived in exile in the northern Indian town of Dharamsala for 18 years, before coming to Australia in 2010. During his time in Dharamsala, Kunga studied the Ashtanga and Hatha Yoga systems under Yoga Master Vijay at the Universal Yoga Centre. At that time he also studied a variety of traditional Tibetan healing practices. Kunga has also completed studies in Buddhist Philosophy at Varanasi University.

MORNING MEDITATION WITH KARMA

MORNING MEDITATION WITH KARMA
18th Saturdat 9.00am – 9.30am (Turbine Platform) FREE


Start your day with a clear and alert mind with Lama Karma Phuntsok’s special meditation experience. Karma will guide us through mantra recitations – energy-based sounds which produce particular positive vibrations.

The word “mantra” is derived from two Sanskrit words – ‘man’ meaning mind and ‘tra’ meaning to protect or to free from. Karma will guide participants through traditional Tibetan Buddhist meditation and thought awareness techniques. A beautiful way to start the day refreshed and re-energized.

FILM HOSTED BY HIMALAYAN FILM FESTIVAL

FILMS: THE SWEET REQUIEM and My SON TENZIN

Hosted by the Brisbane Himalayan Film Festival, this session presents the Brisbane premieres of two outstanding Tibetan feature films. The Sweet Requiem, directed by Ritu Sarin and Tenzing Sonam, is the story of a young Tibetan woman living in Delhi, as she confronts memories of flight, betrayal and childhood trauma. My Son Tenzin, directed by Tsultrim Dorjee and Tashi Wangchuk, is set in California and tells a story of loss and longing and the clash of two cultures.

FILM: MY SON TENZIN
12.30PM – 2PM SATURDAY 18 APRIL TURBINE STUDIO)

A monk from Tibet arrives in the west on an unlikely mission: to meet his son after more than a decade of separation. The story of loss and longing infused with pathos and, at times, humorous, arising from the clashing worlds of Buddhist heritage, Yellow Cab business, and Oakland’s Homelessness, among others.

FILMTHE SWEET REQUIEM
4.30PM – 6PM SATURDAY 18 APRIL TURBINE STUDIO)

The guiding Buddhist notion of impermanence plays a central role in the story of Dolkar, a young woman who embarked on a perilous trek to India with her father when she was a girl. Now firmly part of Delhi’s large Tibetan community, Dolkar is helping Gompo, a recent arrival fleeing Chinese security forces in Lhasa. Slowly, Dolkar recognises Gompo as the guide who abandoned her group on a treacherous Himalayan path all those years ago. But is this really him?

PUBLIC TALK: LIVING AND DYING WELL WITH HIS EMINENCE LING RINPOCH

PUBLIC TALK: LIVING AND DYING WELL WITH HIS EMINENCE LING RINPOCHE
2.30PM – 4PM SATURDAY 18 APRIL (TURBINE PLATFORM)

Hosted by Karuna Hospice, Festival will once again welcome His Eminence Ling Rinpoche, the reincarnation of HH the Dalai Lama’s senior teacher and root Guru. This will be a unique opportunity to hear about the Buddhist approach to living and dying from a recognised Buddhist Master. Buddhism places a great deal of emphasis on understanding death and the process of dying. Although death is usually seen as an ending, from the Buddhist point of view it can also be a pivotal moment of transformation. Through understanding this we can learn to live more fully, focusing on what is essential in our lives with greater clarity and awareness, and learn to face death with greater courage and compassion. This special talk will be moderated by Tracey Porst Chief Executive Officer of Karuna Hospice.